Berit Hedemann

Confessions of a Bear Huntress

A woman is disappointed in life, in betrayals, in defeats and in men, generally speaking. Selling her posh villa in the western part of Oslo, she moves to the abandoned family farm in a secluded valley in the Eastern Norwegian backcountry, where hostility against wolves and bears is the absolute norm. She has made up her mind: In the parking lot behind the gas station, she is going to build a temple celebrating goodness, female sexuality and empirical morale. It is to resemble the Pantheon.

Confessions of a Bear Huntress is a book about hate and desire, about frozen rivers and spiritual women’s hair dressers, about bureaucratic framework conditions for temple-raising in the districts, and about the Sumerian High Priestess Erheduanna, known as the woman who wrote the world’s first erotic poem.

It’s burlesque, intelligent and hilarious.

Adresseavisen

Berit Hedemann sheds a light on the desires and needs of men and women.

Dagsavisen

Berit Hedemann

Image
Julie Pike

Berit Hedemann (b. 1949 in Trysil) has won several international awards for her radio documentaries and radio theatre productions. Her first book, the children’s book Melinda’s Mysterious Mystery, was published in 1990.
All My Contempt. The Story of a Love (2014) was her first work of fiction for adults, described by the critiques as "a furious, painfully resigned debut novel which intelligently dissects the emotional life of a woman who falls for an inveterate, lying drunkard." (Dagsavisen).
Selling her posh villa in the western part of Oslo, she moves to the abandoned family farm in a secluded valley in the Eastern Norwegian backcountry. It is a book about hate and desire, about frozen rivers and about the Sumerian High Priestess Erheduanna, known as the woman who wrote the world’s first erotic poem. It's burlesque, fun and intelligent.

Other titles

Melinda's Mysterious Mystery (1960)
All My Contempt (2014)

Foreign rights

Please contact:
Gyldendal Agency
[email protected]

Edited November 13, 2018 by Gyldendal Agency